John Harvey Kellogg

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John Harvey Kellogg

John Harvey Kellogg (February 26, 1852 – December 14, 1943) was an American medical doctor in Battle Creek, Michigan, who ran a sanitarium using holistic methods, with a particular focus on nutrition, enemas and exercise. Kellogg was an advocate of vegetarianism and is best known for the invention of the corn flakes with his brother, Will Keith Kellogg.[1] He led in the establishment of the American Medical Missionary College. The College, founded in 1895, operated until 1910 when it merged with Illinois State University.


A member of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, Dr. Kellogg frequently held a prominent role as a speaker at church meetings. He promoted a practical, common sense religion.

Kellogg was a skilled surgeon, who often donated his services to indigent patients at his clinic. Although generally against unnecessary surgery to treat diseases,[2] [3] he did advocate circumcision, allegedly to prevent masturbation. [4]

Views on sexuality

As an advocate of sexual abstinence, Kellogg devoted large amounts of his educational and medical work to discouraging sexual activity on the basis of dangers both scientifically understood at the time—as in sexually transmissible diseases—and those taught by the Seventh-day Adventist Church.[5][6][7] He set out his views on such matters in one of his larger books, published in various editions around the start of the 20th century under the title Plain Facts about Sexual Life and later Plain Facts for Old and Young.[8] Some of his work on diet was influenced by his belief that a plain and healthy diet, with only two meals a day, among other things, would reduce sexual feelings. Those experiencing temptation were to avoid stimulating food and drinks, and eat very little meat, if any. Kellogg also advocated hydrotherapy and stressed the importance of keeping the colon clean through yogurt enemas.[9][10]

John Harvey Kellogg and circumcision

Kellogg worked on the rehabilitation of masturbators, often employing extreme measures, even mutilation, on both sexes. He was an advocate of circumcising young boys to curb masturbation and applying phenol (carbolic acid) to a young woman's clitoris. In his Plain Facts for Old and Young,[8] he wrote:

Plain Facts for Old and Young

A remedy which is almost always successful in small boys is circumcision, especially when there is any degree of phimosis. The operation should be performed by a surgeon without administering an anesthetic, as the brief pain attending the operation will have a salutary effect upon the mind, especially if it be connected with the idea of punishment, as it may well be in some cases. The soreness which continues for several weeks interrupts the practice, and if it had not previously become too firmly fixed, it may be forgotten and not resumed.

Plain Facts for Old and Young<


further

Plain Facts for Old and Young

a method of treatment [to prevent masturbation] ... and we have employed it with entire satisfaction. It consists in the application of one or more silver sutures in such a way as to prevent erection. The prepuce, or foreskin, is drawn forward over the glans, and the needle to which the wire is attached is passed through from one side to the other. After drawing the wire through, the ends are twisted together, and cut off close. It is now impossible for an erection to occur, and the slight irritation thus produced acts as a most powerful means of overcoming the disposition to resort to the practice

Plain Facts for Old and Young<


and

Plain Facts for Old and Young

In females, the author has found the application of pure carbolic acid (phenol) to the clitoris an excellent means of allaying the abnormal excitement.

Plain Facts for Old and Young<



He also recommended, to prevent children from this "solitary vice", bandaging or tying their hands, covering their genitals with patented cages and electrical shock.[8]

In his Ladies' Guide in Health and Disease, for nymphomania, he recommended

Ladies' Guide in Health and Disease

Cool sitz baths; the cool enema; a spare diet; the application of blisters and other irritants to the sensitive parts of the sexual organs, the removal of the clitoris and nymphae...



References

  1. "J. H. Kellogg Dies; Health Expert, 91.". New York Times. December 16, 1943. http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/0226.html. Retrieved 2007-10-31. "Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, surgeon, health authority, developer of the Battle Creek Sanitarium and founder of the food business which later became the W. K. Kellogg Company, died here last night at the age of 91, nine years short of the century goal which he had set for himself." 
  2. Kellogg, Dr. John Harvey 1923. Natural Diet of Man
  3. Kellogg, Dr. John Harvey 1923. Autointoxication
  4. "Jewish Virtual Library: CIRCUMCISION". 2008. http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0004_0_04318.html. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  5. David F. Horrobin, M.D., Ph.D., Zinc (St. Albans, Vt.: Vitabooks, Inc., 1981), p. 8. See also Carl C. Pfeiffer, Ph.D., M.D., Zinc and Other Micro-Nutrients (New Canaan, Conn.: Keats Publishing, Inc., 1978), p. 45.
  6. Richard Nies, Ph.D. (Experimental Psychology, UCLA, 1964; equivalent Ph.D. in clinical psychology, including oral exam, but died during dissertation preparation), Lecture, "Give Glory to God," Glendale, Calif., n.d.; Alberta Mazat, M.S.W. (Professor of Marriage and Family Therapy, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, Calif.), Monograph, "Masturbation" (43 pp.), Biblical Research Institute.
  7. Herbert E. Douglass, Messenger of the Lord: the Prophetic Ministry of Ellen G. White (Nampa, Idaho: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1998), pp. 493, 494
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Kellogg, J.H. (1888). "Treatment for Self-Abuse and Its Effects". Plain Facts for Old and Young. Ayer Publishing. pp. 294–296. ISBN 0-405-05808-X, 9780405058080. http://books.google.se/books?id=XjyV7Ow6qFgC&lpg=PA294&dq=%22The%20preliminary%20step%20in%20treatment%22%20intitle%3A%22Plain%20facts%20for%20old%20and%20young%22%20inauthor%3A%22john%20harvey%20kellogg%22%20inpublisher%3A%22Ayer%20Publishing%22&pg=PA294#v=onepage&q&f=false. 
  9. Numbers, Ronald L, "Sex, Science, and Salvation: The Sexual Advice of Ellen G. White and John Harvey Kellogg," in Right Living: An Anglo-American Tradition of Self-Help Medicine and Hygiene ed. Charles Rosenberg, 2003., pp. 218-220
  10. "John Harvey Kellogg (1852-1943)". CNN. http://money.cnn.com/galleries/2007/fortune/0702/gallery.rich_eccentrics.fortune/4.html. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
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